LayoffBlog.com

February 10, 2009

China’s January Exports Fall 17.5%, Most Since 1996

According to Bloomberg: “China’s exports fell by the most in almost 13 years as demand dried up in the U.S. and Europe, worsening the outlook for jobs and industrial production in the world’s third-biggest economy.”

China’s economic slide has already cost the jobs of 20 million migrant workers, adding pressure on the government to boost consumption and expand a 4 trillion yuan ($585 billion) stimulus package. Government researchers have advocated weakening the yuan against the dollar to support exports, a move that could add to trade tensions amid the worst financial crisis since World War II.”

Imports declined 43.1 percent in January from a year earlier, the biggest decline since Bloomberg data began in 1995, on the nation’s waning demand for raw materials for manufacturing and lower commodity prices.”

“China’s industrial output grew 5.7 percent in December, down from 17.4 percent a year earlier.”

“Taiwan’s shipments to the mainland slumped 64 percent in January because of weaker demand for electronic components.”

“Philippine shipments to China fell 58 percent.

“India imposed a six-month ban on imports of Chinese toys last month, citing health concerns.”

January 4, 2009

Asia: Slowdown takes a toll on industries

According to China Daily: “The financial tsunami has triggered panic around the world, with its impact taking a heavy toll on a variety of industries in Hong Kong. Turmoil in the global credit markets has severely weighted down earnings of the banking and finance industry, which triggered a wave of job cuts among local banks.”

  • Starting from September, Europe’s largest bank HSBC laid off 4 percent of its worldwide back-office staff, including 100 employees in Hong Kong
  • In November, HSBC axed 450 jobs in Hong Kong in its second round of layoff.
  • In early November, Southeast Asia’s biggest bank DBS trimmed its workforce by 6 percent, or 900 jobs, in its Hong Kong and Singapore operations
  • Standard Chartered Bank, a UK-based lender focused on emerging markets in Asia,shed 200 jobs – 4 percent of its staff – in Hong Kong in early December.
  • Banks in Hong Kong may further reduce their staff numbers in the first half of 2009
  • In early October, Hong Kong toy maker Smart Union Group closed down its two factories in Dongguan, throwing almost 7,000 workers into unemployment.
  • Around 5,000 factories in the region had already closed down amid the financial meltdown.
  • The Christmas sales in the US tumbled around 20 to 30 percent this year, which means the export market for the mainland has significantly shrunk
  • Hong Kong-funded factories in the PRD may close down in 2009
  • The bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers in September has also severely affected more than 40,000 holders of Lehman’s minibonds in Hong Kong

Stepping into 2009, economists expect it may take quite a while for the territory’s economy to bounce back, according to China Daily

November 21, 2008

Top official meets rioters as China seeks stability

According to Reuters: “The governor of a Chinese province sat down with protesters after they fought pitched battles with police, a rare concession by a leader and a sign of government concerns about stability as the economy slows.

Xu Shousheng held a meeting with 10 representatives in Wudu in the poverty-stricken northwestern province of Gansu two days after the riot in which dozens were injured, state media said.”

Reuters

Riots in China

Photo: Reuters

November 20, 2008

Data dim hopes of Asian stability

According to International Herald Tribune: “Yin Weimin, China’s minister of human resources and social security, warned that unemployment would rise further next year and that “stabilizing employment is the top priority for us right now,” Reuters reported. It was a sign that the Chinese authorities were increasingly concerned about the potential social fallout in a slowing economy.”

 Data dim hopes of Asian stability

Data dim hopes of Asian stability

Photo: The Associated Press

China fears job riots

According to CNN: “China’s job outlook is “grim,” and the global financial crisis could cause more layoffs and more labor unrest until the country’s economic stimulus package kicks in next year, the nation’s minister of human resources and social security said Thursday.
Thousands of graduates crowd a jobs fair in Nanjing but vacancies are becoming harder to find. The stimulus package, unveiled earlier this month, will pump $585 billion into rebuilding communities destroyed by the May earthquake, constructing railways, housing, airports and highways, and funding other projects.”

China fears job riots

China fears job riots

Photo: CNN

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